A Look At 5 Underrated Sequels

Most people know that sequels are commonly the death of what starts as a good movie concept. The film making industry’s main focus is to make as much money as possible, but while the money rolls in quality ideas often get harder and harder to think of over time. Eventually, the end result is a last sequel devoid of any bona fide concept. In fact, many continuations often regurgitate what has come before, just in different “packaging.”

However, every so often a continuation will come along that prolongs the novelty value of a film franchise. It is a rarity that a film series ends on a high note, but if one looks hard enough a sequel of at least passable standard can be found.

This feature today will examine 5 sequels in varying genres that are considered underrated.

Feel free to add your own in the comments below!

Halloween 4 (1988)

Halloween III: The Season of the Witch tried something a little different in not reintroducing Michael Myers as the central force of evil, instead taking a completely different path and introducing audiences to a brand new narrative. But fans of the first two Halloween films cried out for yet another appearance by the sister killer and their wishes were granted.

Director Dwight H. Little did an admirable job in at least bringing back the type of mystical and haunting atmosphere that was contained in the first two movies. Little respected John Carpenter’s approach in that he wanted to terrify audiences by only showing glimpses of Myers, which the Ohio based director also imitated.

The narrative hinted that the series was started to clutch at straws but this is probably the last “good” Halloween film until the critically acclaimed Halloween: H20 made ten years later.

The Crow: City of Angels (1996)

Swiss actor Vincent Perez had big shoes to fill after Brandon Lee’s principal performance as Eric Draven in 1994’s The Crow. And perhaps it was a tad insensitive of Dimension Films to want to film a sequel so soon after Lee’s tragic death. Regardless, it happened. And the film unsurprisingly tanked.

But in fairness, there are a few good things about this one and only direct sequel (the follow ups are in no way linked to the original). For starters, the narrative explains that a father and son are murdered which is perhaps even more daunting and tragic than losing a fiancee, as Draven did in the first film. Perez’ performance, while maybe coming off as a little too depressing, was as meticulous as the screenplay allowed it to be.

Punk singer Iggy Pop is more than competent as one of the murderous yobs and is possibly even more charismatic than Top Dollar or any of the other villains in the film’s predecessor. Thuy Trang, of former Power Rangers fame, plays Kali, the soulless villainess who has the ability to defend herself more with than just a gun making for an interesting cast of bad guys all with their own interesting facade’s.

The Crow: City of Angels is certainly not the best movie in this now downtrodden franchise. It isn’t even the best sequel! But it is nowhere near the worst, either.

Lethal Weapon 4 (1998)

Riggs and Murtaugh were getting a bit long in the tooth to be doing what they were doing. And Lethal Weapon 4 made the sharp witted decision to play on this throughout the course of the last chapter in this definitive buddy cop movie series. While Lethal Weapon 3 was devoid of much fun, this sequel had to reach new lengths of mindless entertainment to reignite some of the enjoyment that was previously missing.

But the film’s final tale did effectively keep things constrained and made no bones about there never being another follow up, which is very telling during the final act and end credits for those that are more abstract minded.

Lethal Weapon 4 gave the much loved action series the sending off it deserved!

Die Hard 2 (1990)

Die Hard is a movie that has to be watched at least once every year, especially at Christmas time. The television networks even encourage us, since the movie is almost guaranteed to be shown during nearly every festive period.
As what happens often when a movie grand in scale and originality, it is received with infinite affection. And it’s 1990 sequel was always never going to receive as much acclaim. Most sequels try to up the ante and amplify the magnitude in comparison to it’s original counterpart. And an airport was the film’s choice to apply that effect.

Unlike in the first film when John McClane was confined to a room all on his own which prevented him from stopping much of the chaos, Die Hard 2 gave the character a lot more freedom which resulted in a more physical role. The only thing unfavourable is the lack of a memorable villain. The movie’s main bad guy elects to cause madness behind a walkie talkie giving orders while McClane runs around trying to prevent impending disaster.

But the element of action is much more sustainable this time around, making for a less serious but more amusing installment.

Predator 2 (1990)

Arnold Schwarzenegger getting his money run for by a dreadlock wearing alien. That was never going to be topped! But the Danny Glover starring sequel in an urban setting contains a fair amount of humour with enough drab atmosphere that makes the predator feel right at home!

Glover plays cop Harrigan who wants revenge for the murder of his friend, killed off early by the skull carrying hunter. The film is generally much more to the point without much build up, but did it need that? Viewers were already filled in on the specifics in the classic original. The final battle between Harrigan and the predator is thrilling and need you be reminded that this is the film which started the Alien v Predator face off idea!

But let’s end it here and try to keep those awful Alien v Predator movies forever banished from our minds, eh?

The post A Look At 5 Underrated Sequels appeared first on Age of The Nerd.

Terrible Scenes That Ruined 5 Movies

No feature is perfect, even if millions of dollars have been poured into it’s creation process. Some have come quite close, although most would agree that even the most classical movie has it’s flaws. But every so often, a picture comes along that looks great when viewing it’s theatrical trailer, encouraging hoards of people to go and see it. The hype machine bangs on about how great it is and everything starts well, only for one terrible scene to ruin, or nearly ruin a good flick.

Some of these scenes evoke disappointment while others make us roll with laughter!

Today, we are going to explore 5 films that almost made it to the finishing line but came unstuck when it’s filmmakers thought one daft idea would actually be a great thing, proving just how out of touch filmmakers can be when it comes to what we desire.

Can you think of anymore? Sound off in the comments below!

Street fight scene in Rocky V (1990)

This writer is of the opinion that Rocky V is actually not as bad a movie that most make it out to be. The route it took in it’s narrative was logical after Rocky fought the biggest and toughest opponent of his career in Ivan Drago. But as well shot as the final street fight scene is, it felt just a little too different from what had come before. It was always going to be a climax that was going to be hard to be accepted, although Rocky retained the glory of his local people rather than the world.

Smaller scale, indeed.

Dancing scene in Spiderman 3 (2007)

Even without the cringe worthy dancing scene in which an evil Peter Parker struts along the streets of New York wearing eye liner and a curtain hair style, Spiderman 3 is definitely the worst of the trilogy. But if one forgets this 20 seconds of particular footage, the picture is actually quite watchable! It is no coincidence that when people discuss this third installment that the dancing scene almost always is brought up. And usually not for any good reason!

Come to think of it, the entire part when Parker turns bad is…well, bad.

Surfing scene in Die Another Day (2002)

Die Another Day was probably the lowest ever point that the James Bond franchise fell to back in 2002. To give it the benefit of the doubt, the first hour is actually pretty decent but as soon as our beloved British agent travels to the villain’s ice palace then that is when things go down hill very quickly. There are many scenes to choose from if one was to point out how bad Die Another Day is but the scene when Bond surfs away from a huge tsunami like wave toward the end of the movie really put it into perspective just how starved of a reboot that this franchise was.

The bad CGI certainly did not make things any better and is regarded as one of cinema’s poorest ever CGI filled moment in history!

Blake correctly guessing Batman’s identity in The Dark Knight Rises (2012)

It was always going to be a humongous task to better the success of The Dark Knight. Everybody knew this even before the movie was released. But that is no excuse for lazy writing when in a scene when officer Blake visits Bruce Wayne, he tells him that he knew who his alter ego is just by noticing the same expression in Bruce that Batman has. Really?!? Isn’t the point of a disguise to conceal such things?

This particular scene smacks of “we cannot be bothered, let’s just let the audience go with it.” Unfortunately for the filmmakers, there are viewers that have at least a modicum of intelligence. Director Christopher Nolan filmed his Batman films in a particular style reminiscent in such gangster films as Goodfellas and Heat. But you can put a pile of money on it that those audiences would not accept such an indolent moment.

Superman rewinding time in Superman (1978)

It is a cinematic moment that will be debated until the end of time (bad pun, I know), but it still confuses to this day. To briefly recap, Lois Lane died during an earthquake and Superman decided to reverse time to bring her back from the dead. There is just one thought that nags many. How can rewinding time ensure that the earthquake would not still happen without altering some other moment precluding that?

The original Superman movie will always stand as a classic but, unless the time reversing scene is skipped entirely, you will always watch the end credits scratching your head.

The post Terrible Scenes That Ruined 5 Movies appeared first on Age of The Nerd.

Finding Your Way Back To ‘Collateral Beauty’ After Suffering A Great Loss!

(PCM) There is nothing that shakes you to the core than the loss of a loved one, so much so that it appears there is nothing that will ever make you smile again. That journey, from loss and grief to finding a way back to joy, is at the center of the heart-felt new movie, “Collateral Beauty,” a highly emotional holiday endeavor.

The film, from New Line Cinema, opens on Friday, Dec. 16. is about Howard Inlet, masterfully performed by Will Smith, is an ad exec, whose world stopped after the death of his six-year-old daughter. He spends his time erecting intricate domino arrangements, only to turn his back when they begin to tumble. His marriage, business and friendships are all in shambles and he feels powerless to find his way back to some semblance of a fulfilling life.

Howard does, in fact,write letters to the universe in the entities of Time, Love and Death, and is rattled when he begins to get answers. Time is played by Jacob Latimore, Love is played by Keira Knightley, and the charming and comedic Helen Mirren portrays Death.

The movie was written by Allan Loeb, (“Wall Street: Money Never Sleeps” “The Switch,”` and 21”),directed by David Frankel (“Marley & Me”), and also stars Ed Norton, Kate Winslet and Naomi Harris, who round out the suburb A-list cast.

When asked what appealed to him about Loeb’s screenplay Will Smith said he was struck by that “Christmas flavor that I remember growing up in “It’s a Wonderful Life,” and those types of films that are right on the edge of fantasy.”

Smith, the iconic 48-year-old actor, whose range includes romantic comedies, comic book, Sci-Fi, as well as highly dramatic films, added that those films have that special “Christmas magic to it, right on the edge, but dealing with things that are deeply and powerfully real and human”

Smith said that his character of Howard, “had life figured out, and then suffered a loss, and had to make his way back to even believing there was a possibility to have joy again. So I love that journey,” he added.

“Howard thinks about life a lot of the ways that I think about life,” the actor said. “So how he had to move from his mind, he had to move from thinking that he could solve all of the issues of life with his mind into accepting that there’s a certain amount of bleeding that you have to do to be able to purge and cleanse yourself to be able to experience joy, that the pain and joy and growth are all inexorably bound.”

The film makers say that while the story isn’t exactly a typical Christmas story, “yet it is about the holiday period, which is a time of both loneliness and magic, which really figured into the movie,” explained Anthony Bregman, one of the producers.

“It really is a time where people kind of take stock of family and take stock of what’s important to them, and that really figured into it. I think besides thematically the holiday season presented for [director] David Frankel a way to beautifully talk visually about the magic in our lives,” Bregman said.

“The beauty of the film is really in the lighting of the film and these little points of light that come from the decorations,” he added. “There’s this elevated sense visually of what life can be, which really matches what’s going on in the movie.”

Here is more of an inside look at “Collateral Beauty,” from the film’s creators:

Q: What is the ‘Collateral Beauty,” the characters, as well as each of us, is striving for?

ALLAN LOEB: The way you see the world; the way your heart opens and the way you relate to people after a tragedy can be very beautiful. It can be transformative.

Q:Allan, what was the spark for this story?

AL: About eight or nine years ago, I had this idea for this, but I didn’t write it until about two years ago. The first concept was someone writing letters to these abstractions. I didn’t even know what they were, but then eventually I kind of landed on Time, Love, and Death. It was a germ of a concept that grew.

Q: How so?

AL: It was a little story in my head that kept nagging at me, about a man who writes letters to abstractions like Time, Love and Death, and why would he do that?

Q: What happened after that?

AL: Well, then I kind of built it out from there over a period of years, actually. I just started with the idea of someone writing letters and the idea of his friends, his coworkers,his employees, I wasn’t sure who they were, gas lighting him, actually.

Q: Please tell me more.

AL: But finding the letters, and gas lighting him in order that they could sell the company.Actually it wasn’t as benevolent as it is in the movie. I think they care about him. In my earlier concept they just wanted to cash out, which makes them less likeable. And it just kind of came together from there, and I had no idea what it was. And for years it was just a story that kind of haunted me and stayed with me, until finally I pounded it out, sometime in 2014.

Q: Overall, what is the movie about?

AL: I believe that each of the characters have something to say that they weren’t able to say, and obviously Howard’s character in particular wasn’t able to for quite a longtime. So for me, that is something that I find very human. We all have something to say, and we’re all looking for someone to hear us. That was the connective tissue.

Q: How do you see the concept of collateral beauty?

DAVID FRANKEL: It’s really those things we sometimes take for granted or don’t notice all the time when they are taking place, but might be there every day, like a sunset, or fleeting moments like a child’s smile.

Q: Please tell me more.

DF: There are millions of examples of collateral beauty; they’re unique, and we all have different ideas about what they could be. They are the reason that we go on, and I think what’s really compelling about this story is that it reminds us to take notice of those brilliant fragments of life that make it worth living.

Q: Howard begins his journey as a highly successful and dynamic ad exec who uses the concepts of Time, Love and Death as powerful marketing tools. Then he changes.

SF: Yes, when his young daughter succumbs to be a fatal illness, his only communication are these angry an accusatory letters he writes to the universe. He is struggling with big, philosophical questions and looking to the universe for answers. Like a modern day King Lear, you might say that he is howling at the Gods.

Q: As the film’s director, David, could this movie have been shot anywhere else other than New York?

DF: I don’t think it could happen anywhere. I think there’s something really special about this city at Christmas that’s hard to describe. But I think you get a window into it when Howard’s riding across the bridge and with Claire [Kate Winslet’s character] seeing the Bergdorf windows. There are just these iconic images that we associate with magic. I think Christmas in New York is a special time, and I think it represents a magical world to people who live in every city in the world. So it was just a terrific opportunity to set the movie here.

The post Finding Your Way Back To ‘Collateral Beauty’ After Suffering A Great Loss! first appeared on Movie News & Reviews.

Ranking The Spiderman Movies From Worst To Best

A teaser for the upcoming Spiderman: Homecoming trailer has been released hinting at an upgrade for our web slinging hero. Spiderman: Homecoming will be the sixth Spiderman film to be released since Sam Raimi’s original released back in 2002. It went on to spawn two more sequels eventually resulting in a reboot and yet another continuation that ultimately flopped.

Spiderman: Homecoming looks to be bringing back some of the humour and fun that the character was always meant to bring to its audience despite the fact that he is now incorporated into Marvel’s extended universe. Of course, we’ll have to definitely see if the movie ends up being as good as the hype is promising it to be. Time will tell.

Today, this editorial is going to attempt to rank each Spiderman film released so far from worst to best. Let us know if you agree or disagree in the comments!

The Amazing Spiderman (2012)

the-amazing-spider-man-2-andrew-garfield2

Andrew Garfield took over the role that had been Tobey Maguire’s for half a decade, and while there was not anything particularly wrong with his performance, the writing was pretty substandard and it’s attempt at humour was almost farcical at times. Contradiction also disturbed character development. Since when does a bullied nerd have the audacity to break into a high security laboratory?

The action sequences also fell short of producing something fresh and the whole experience felt underwhelming for a reboot that promised to elevate the franchise out of the mess that Spiderman 3 got itself into.

The Amazing Spiderman 2 (2014)

amazingspiderman2-07

The most recent Spiderman picture to date, this sequel was only a marginal improvement over it’s predecessor despite the shocking ending. Action scenes, however, were spoiled by corny slow motion editing and even freeze frame! Some odd choices were definitely made in order to give us more of an insight into how Spiderman does his thing. But it all leaves you thinking of that old adage that sometimes you are best off not knowing. Besides the action, the story and drama regarding Peter’s personal life failed to resonate at all.

Let us all hope that they have something that is going to be memorable for us in the next reboot!

Spiderman 3 (2007)

lsu3lxtg51aevfij3tol

Reshoots, stunts that went wrong, a nearly three year long shooting schedule, recycled elements from Spiderman 2…..well, we get the picture. And yes, they actually used some of Kirsten Dunst’s screams from Spiderman 2 in this film. You know the franchise has jumped the shark when an evil Peter Parker does a cheesy dance for us wearing eye liner and a curtain hairstyle in the middle of New York.

It wasn’t all bad, though. The special effects were astonishing, film found a memorable way to finally seal the tension between Spiderman and Green Goblin 2 and that final shot of Peter and Mary’s hands uniting was probably a righteous way to end what can be considered a superhero trilogy. Bruce Campbell also has probably the funniest cameo in all of the three movies, too.

But….that dance.

Spiderman 2 (2004)

sm2

Spiderman 2 probably has the edge over the original in terms of pure action and entertainment, although the first one contains the superior dramatic factor. This first continuation was much more physical for Spiderman and Alfred Molina’s multi-tentacled Doc Ock had a presence to match.

The ongoing romantic build up between Peter and Mary Jane Watson was still being worked on although it is finally resolved in this film, narrowly avoiding tedium. The newly born friction between Peter and Harry Osborn reaches boiling point, all making for a nail biting secondary plot.

Spiderman (2002)

tobey-maguire-as-peter-parker-in-columbia-pictures-spider-man-2002-12

We thought we only had to witness uncle Ben’s death once when this was released back in 2002. Boy, how wrong we were! Don’t worry. Apparently, we don’t have to see it all again in the next reinvention. Apparently! No promises are being made here. Anyway, the Green Goblin still looks like something out of a Power Rangers television episode but Willem Defoe’s manic performance remains as good as it always has been.

Spiderman had just the right amount of action and heart to make a well rounded superhero picture that was worthy of being made on the 40th anniversary of the character’s creation. Director Sam Raimi proved that he wasn’t a one trick pony who could only direct low budget horror movies and this is probably still his crowning achievement to date, although the man himself may consider the sequel to be that for it’s bigger scope of operation.

The post Ranking The Spiderman Movies From Worst To Best appeared first on Age of The Nerd.

Award Season Kicks off With the 22nd Annual Critics Choice Awards

The Broadcast Film Critics Association (BFCA) has announced the film nominees for the 22nd Annual Critics’ Choice Awards.  The winners will be revealed live at the star-studded Critics’ Choice Awards gala, which will be broadcast  on Sunday, December 11 at 8PM ET/ 5PM PT.  The awards broadcast will immediately follow the “Critics’ Choice Red Carpet Live” on A&E.  Actor and comedian T.J. Miller will return as the show’s host.

“La La Land” leads all films this year with 12 nominations including Best Picture, Ryan Gosling for Best Actor, Emma Stone for Best Actress, Damien Chazelle for Best Director and Best Original Screenplay, Linus Sandgren for Best Cinematography, David Wasco and Sandy Reynolds-Wasco for Best Production Design, Tom Cross for Best Editing, Mary Zophres for Best Costume Design, Two Best Song Nominations for “Audition (The Fools Who Dream)” and “City of Stars,” and Justin Hurwitz for Best Score.

LLL d 12 _2353.NEF

“Arrival” and “Moonlight” impressed with ten nominations each, both in the running for Best Picture, Best Director, Best Cinematography, Best Editing, Best Score, among others.  “Manchester by the Sea” earned eight nominations, followed by “Hacksaw Ridge” with seven, and “Doctor Strange,” “Fences,” “Hell or High Water,” “Jackie,” and “Lion” all with six.

moonlight

There are a number of double nominees this year including Denzel Washington for his work as an actor and as the director of the Best Picture nominee “Fences.”  Andrew Garfield is up for two acting awards for his work in “Hacksaw Ridge,” as is Ryan Reynolds for “Deadpool,” Lucas Hedges for “Manchester by the Sea,” and Hailee Steinfeld for “The Edge of Seventeen.”  Ryan Gosling is also nominated for two acting awards one for “La La Land” and another for “The Nice Guys.”  Kenneth Lonergan could earn two awards for directing and writing the screenplay for “Manchester by the Sea,” the same two categories in which Barry Jenkins competes for his work on “Moonlight.”

“This year’s nominees showcase the best that Hollywood has to offer, spanning a wide array of genres, subject matters, time periods, and more,” said BFCA President Joey Berlin.  “We hope that they will serve as a roadmap for viewers, offering guidance for movie lovers and ticket buyers as we launch this awards season.  We are so thrilled to be able to recognize these incomparable artists and look forward to bringing them together for an unforgettable evening!”

HBO leads the television honors with 22 nominations, followed by ABC and Netflix with 14 each, and FX with 12.  Topping the list of nominated series is The People v. O.J. Simpson (FX) with six.  Game of Thrones (HBO), The Night Manager (AMC), and Unbreakable Kimmy Schmidt (Netflix) follow closely behind with five each.  All the Way (HBO), House of Cards (Netflix), Roots (History), and Veep (HBO) all earned four nominations.  Other multi-nominated series include American Crime (ABC), Black-ish (ABC), Killing Reagan (National Geographic),Modern Family (ABC), Mr. Robot (USA Network), Ray Donovan (Showtime), Saturday Night Live (NBC), The Crown(Netflix), and Westworld (HBO) with three, and America’s Got Talent (NBC), Anthony Bourdain: Parts Unknown (CNN), Atlanta (FX), Better Call Saul (AMC), Chopped (Food Network), Confirmation (HBO), Fleabag (Amazon), Outlander (Starz), RuPaul’s Drag Race (Logo), Silicon Valley (HBO), The Americans (FX), The Dresser (Starz), The Good Wife (CBS), The Voice (NBC), and Transparent (Amazon) each with two nominations. Check out a list of all the nominees below!

“The Critics’ Choice Awards” are bestowed annually by the BFCA and BTJA to honor the finest in cinematic and television achievement. The BFCA is the largest film critics’ organization in the United States and Canada, representing more than 300 television, radio and online critics. BFCA members are the primary source of information for today’s film-going public. BTJA is the collective voice of almost 100 journalists who regularly cover television for TV viewers, radio listeners and online audiences. Historically, the “Critics’ Choice Awards” are the most accurate predictor of the Academy Award nominations.

FILM NOMINATIONS FOR THE 22ND ANNUAL CRITICS’ CHOICE AWARDS

BEST PICTURE

Arrival
Fences
Hacksaw Ridge
Hell or High Water
La La Land
Lion
Loving
Manchester by the Sea
Moonlight
Sully
 

BEST ACTOR

Casey Affleck – Manchester by the Sea

Joel Edgerton – Loving

Andrew Garfield – Hacksaw Ridge

Ryan Gosling – La La Land

Tom Hanks – Sully

Denzel Washington – Fences

 

BEST ACTRESS

Amy Adams – Arrival

Annette Bening – 20th Century Women

Isabelle Huppert – Elle

Ruth Negga – Loving

Natalie Portman – Jackie

Emma Stone – La La Land

 

BEST SUPPORTING ACTOR

Mahershala Ali – Moonlight

Jeff Bridges – Hell or High Water

Ben Foster – Hell or High Water

Lucas Hedges – Manchester by the Sea

Dev Patel – Lion

Michael Shannon – Nocturnal Animals

 

BEST SUPPORTING ACTRESS

Viola Davis – Fences

Greta Gerwig – 20th Century Women

Naomie Harris – Moonlight

Nicole Kidman – Lion

Janelle Monáe  – Hidden Figures

Michelle Williams – Manchester by the Sea

 

BEST YOUNG ACTOR/ACTRESS

Lucas Hedges – Manchester by the Sea

Alex R. Hibbert – Moonlight

Lewis MacDougall – A Monster Calls

Madina Nalwanga – Queen of Katwe

Sunny Pawar – Lion

Hailee Steinfeld – The Edge of Seventeen

 

BEST ACTING ENSEMBLE

20th Century Women

Fences

Hell or High Water

Hidden Figures

Manchester by the Sea

Moonlight

 

BEST DIRECTOR

Damien Chazelle – La La Land

Mel Gibson – Hacksaw Ridge

Barry Jenkins – Moonlight

Kenneth Lonergan – Manchester by the Sea

David Mackenzie – Hell or High Water

Denis Villeneuve – Arrival

Denzel Washington – Fences

 

BEST ORIGINAL SCREENPLAY

Damien Chazelle – La La Land

Barry Jenkins – Moonlight

Yorgos Lanthimos/Efthimis Filippou – The Lobster

Kenneth Lonergan – Manchester by the Sea

Jeff Nichols – Loving

Taylor Sheridan – Hell or High Water

 

BEST ADAPTED SCREENPLAY

Luke Davies – Lion

Tom Ford – Nocturnal Animals

Eric Heisserer – Arrival

Todd Komarnicki – Sully

Allison Schroeder/Theodore Melfi – Hidden Figures

August Wilson – Fences

 

BEST CINEMATOGRAPHY

Stéphane Fontaine – Jackie

James Laxton – Moonlight

Seamus McGarvey – Nocturnal Animals

Linus Sandgren – La La Land

Bradford Young – Arrival

 

BEST PRODUCTION DESIGN

Arrival – Patrice Vermette, Paul Hotte/André Valade

Fantastic Beasts and Where to Find Them – Stuart Craig/James Hambidge, Anna Pinnock

Jackie – Jean Rabasse, Véronique Melery

La La Land – David Wasco, Sandy Reynolds-Wasco

Live by Night – Jess Gonchor, Nancy Haigh

 

BEST EDITING

Tom Cross – La La Land

John Gilbert – Hacksaw Ridge

Blu Murray – Sully

Nat Sanders/Joi McMillon – Moonlight

Joe Walker – Arrival

 

BEST COSTUME DESIGN

Colleen Atwood – Fantastic Beasts and Where to Find Them

Consolata Boyle – Florence Foster Jenkins

Madeline Fontaine – Jackie

Joanna Johnston – Allied

Eimer Ni Mhaoldomhnaigh – Love & Friendship

Mary Zophres – La La Land

 

BEST HAIR & MAKEUP

Doctor Strange

Fantastic Beasts and Where to Find Them

Hacksaw Ridge

Jackie

Star Trek Beyond

 

BEST VISUAL EFFECTS

A Monster Calls

Arrival

Doctor Strange

Fantastic Beasts and Where to Find Them

The Jungle Book

 

BEST ANIMATED FEATURE

Finding Dory

Kubo and the Two Strings

Moana

The Red Turtle

Trolls

Zootopia

 

BEST ACTION MOVIE

Captain America: Civil War

Deadpool

Doctor Strange

Hacksaw Ridge

Jason Bourne

 

BEST ACTOR IN AN ACTION MOVIE

Benedict Cumberbatch – Doctor Strange

Matt Damon – Jason Bourne

Chris Evans – Captain America: Civil War

Andrew Garfield – Hacksaw Ridge

Ryan Reynolds – Deadpool

 

BEST ACTRESS IN AN ACTION MOVIE

Gal Gadot – Batman v Superman: Dawn of Justice

Scarlett Johansson – Captain America: Civil War

Margot Robbie – Suicide Squad

Tilda Swinton – Doctor Strange

 

BEST COMEDY

Central Intelligence

Deadpool

Don’t Think Twice

The Edge of Seventeen

Hail, Caesar!

The Nice Guys

 

BEST ACTOR IN A COMEDY

Ryan Gosling – The Nice Guys

Hugh Grant – Florence Foster Jenkins

Dwayne Johnson – Central Intelligence

Viggo Mortensen – Captain Fantastic

Ryan Reynolds – Deadpool

 

BEST ACTRESS IN A COMEDY

Kate Beckinsale – Love & Friendship

Sally Field – Hello, My Name Is Doris

Kate McKinnon – Ghostbusters

Hailee Steinfeld – The Edge of Seventeen

Meryl Streep – Florence Foster Jenkins

 

BEST SCI-FI/HORROR MOVIE

10 Cloverfield Lane

Arrival

Doctor Strange

Don’t Breathe

Star Trek Beyond

The Witch

 

BEST FOREIGN LANGUAGE FILM

Elle

The Handmaiden

Julieta

Neruda

The Salesman

Toni Erdmann

 

BEST SONG

Audition (The Fools Who Dream) – La La Land

Can’t Stop the Feeling – Trolls

City of Stars – La La Land

Drive It Like You Stole It – Sing Street

How Far I’ll Go – Moana

The Rules Don’t Apply – Rules Don’t Apply

 

BEST SCORE

Nicholas Britell – Moonlight

Jóhann Jóhannsson – Arrival

Justin Hurwitz – La La Land

Micachu – Jackie

Dustin O’Halloran, Hauschka – Lion

 

 

NOMINEES BY PICTURE FOR THE 22nd ANNUAL CRITICS’ CHOICE AWARDS

 

10 CLOVERFIELD LANE (1)

Best Sci-Fi/Horror Movie

 

20TH CENTURY WOMEN (3)

Best Actress – Annette Bening

Best Supporting Actress – Greta Gerwig

Best Acting Ensemble

 

A MONSTER CALLS (2)

Best Young Actor/Actress – Lewis MacDougall

Best Visual Effects

 

ALLIED (1)

Best Costume Design – Joanna Johnston

 

ARRIVAL (10)

Best Picture

Best Actress – Amy Adams

Best Director – Denis Villeneuve

Best Adapted Screenplay – Eric Heisserer

Best Cinematography – Bradford Young

Best Production Design – Patrice Vermette, Paul Hotte/André Valade

Best Editing – Joe Walker

Best Visual Effects

Best Sci-Fi/Horror Movie

Best Score – Jóhann Jóhannsson

 

BATMAN V SUPERMAN: DAWN OF JUSTICE (1)

Best Actress In An Action Movie – Gal Gadot

 

CAPTAIN AMERICA: CIVIL WAR (3)

Best Action Movie

Best Actor In An Action Movie – Chris Evans

Best Actress In An Action Movie – Scarlett Johansson

 

CAPTAIN FANTASTIC (1)

Best Actor In A Comedy – Viggo Mortensen

 

CENTRAL INTELLIGENCE (2)

Best Comedy

Best Actor In A Comedy – Dwayne Johnson

 

DEADPOOL (4)

Best Action Movie

Best Actor In An Action Movie – Ryan Reynolds

Best Comedy

Best Actor In A Comedy – Ryan Reynolds

 

DOCTOR STRANGE (6)

Best Hair & Makeup

Best Visual Effects

Best Action Movie

Best Actor In An Action Movie – Benedict Cumberbatch

Best Actress In An Action Movie – Tilda Swinton

Best Sci-Fi/Horror Movie

 

DON’T BREATHE (1)

Best Sci-Fi/Horror Movie

 

DON’T THINK TWICE (1)

Best Comedy

 

ELLE (2)

Best Actress – Isabelle Huppert

Best Foreign Language Film

 

FANTASTIC BEASTS AND WHERE TO FIND THEM (4)

Best Production Design – Stuart Craig/James Hambidge, Anna Pinnock

Best Costume Design – Colleen Atwood

Best Hair & Makeup

Best Visual Effects

 

FENCES (6)

Best Picture

Best Actor – Denzel Washington

Best Supporting Actress – Viola Davis

Best Acting Ensemble

Best Director – Denzel Washington

Best Adapted Screenplay – August Wilson

 

FINDING DORY (1)

Best Animated Feature


FLORENCE FOSTER JENKINS (3)

Best Costume Design – Consolata Boyle

Best Actor In A Comedy – Hugh Grant

Best Actress In A Comedy – Meryl Streep

 

GHOSTBUSTERS (1)

Best Actress In A Comedy – Kate McKinnon

 

HACKSAW RIDGE (7)

Best Picture

Best Actor – Andrew Garfield

Best Director – Mel Gibson

Best Editing – John Gilbert

Best Hair & Makeup

Best Action Movie

Best Actor In An Action Movie – Andrew Garfield

 

HAIL, CAESAR! (1)

Best Comedy

 

HELL OR HIGH WATER (6)

Best Picture

Best Supporting Actor – Jeff Bridges

Best Supporting Actor – Ben Foster

Best Acting Ensemble

Best Director – David Mackenzie

Best Original Screenplay – Taylor Sheridan

 

HELLO, MY NAME IS DORIS (1)

Best Actress In A Comedy – Sally Field

 

HIDDEN FIGURES (3)

Best Supporting Actress – Janelle Monáe

Best Acting Ensemble

Best Adapted Screenplay – Allison Schroeder/Theodore Melfi

 

JACKIE (6)

Best Actress – Natalie Portman

Best Cinematography – Stéphane Fontaine

Best Production Design – Jean Rabasse, Véronique Melery

Best Costume Design – Madeline Fontaine

Best Hair & Makeup

Best Score – Micachu

 

JASON BOURNE (2)

Best Action Movie

Best Actor In An Action Movie – Matt Damon

 

JULIETA (1)

Best Foreign Language Film

 

KUBO AND THE TWO STRINGS (1)

Best Animated Feature

 

LA LA LAND (12)

Best Picture

Best Actor – Ryan Gosling

Best Actress – Emma Stone

Best Director – Damien Chazelle

Best Original Screenplay – Damien Chazelle

Best Cinematography – Linus Sandgren

Best Production Design – David Wasco, Sandy Reynolds-Wasco

Best Editing – Tom Cross

Best Costume Design – Mary Zophres

Best Song – Audition (The Fools Who Dream)

Best Song – City of Stars

Best Score – Justin Hurwitz

 

LION (6)

Best Picture

Best Supporting Actor – Dev Patel

Best Supporting Actress – Nicole Kidman

Best Young Actor/Actress – Sunny Pawar

Best Adapted Screenplay – Luke Davies

Best Score – Dustin O’Halloran, Hauschka

 

LIVE BY NIGHT (1)

Best Production Design – Jess Gonchor, Nancy Haigh

 

LOVE & FRIENDSHIP (2)

Best Costume Design – Eimer Ni Mhaoldomhnaigh

Best Actress In A Comedy – Kate Beckinsale

 

LOVING (4)

Best Picture

Best Actor – Joel Edgerton

Best Actress – Ruth Negga

Best Original Screenplay – Jeff Nichols

 

MANCHESTER BY THE SEA (8)

Best Picture

Best Actor – Casey Affleck

Best Supporting Actor – Lucas Hedges

Best Supporting Actress – Michelle Williams

Best Young Actor/Actress – Lucas Hedges

Best Acting Ensemble

Best Director – Kenneth Lonergan

Best Original Screenplay – Kenneth Lonergan

 

MOANA (2)

Best Animated Feature

Best Song – How Far I’ll Go

 

MOONLIGHT (10)

Best Picture

Best Supporting Actor – Mahershala Ali

Best Supporting Actress – Naomie Harris

Best Young Actor/Actress – Alex R. Hibbert

Best Acting Ensemble

Best Director – Barry Jenkins

Best Original Screenplay – Barry Jenkins

Best Cinematography – James Laxton

Best Editing – Nat Sanders/Joi McMillon

Best Score – Nicholas Britell

 

NERUDA (1)

Best Foreign Language Film

 

NOCTURNAL ANIMALS (3)

Best Supporting Actor – Michael Shannon

Best Adapted Screenplay – Tom Ford

Best Cinematography – Seamus McGarvey

 

QUEEN OF KATWE (1)

Best Young Actor/Actress – Madina Nalwanga

 

RULES DON’T APPLY (1)

Best Song – The Rules Don’t Apply

 

SING STREET (1)

Best Song – Drive It Like You Stole It

 

STAR TREK BEYOND (2)

Best Hair & Makeup

Best Sci-Fi/Horror Movie

 

SUICIDE SQUAD (1)

Best Actress In An Action Movie – Margot Robbie

 

SULLY (4)

Best Picture

Best Actor – Tom Hanks

Best Adapted Screenplay – Todd Komarnicki

Best Editing – Blu Murray

 

THE EDGE OF SEVENTEEN (3)

Best Young Actor/Actress – Hailee Steinfeld

Best Comedy

Best Actress In A Comedy – Hailee Steinfeld

 

THE HANDMAIDEN (1)

Best Foreign Language Film

THE JUNGLE BOOK (1)

Best Visual Effects

 

THE LOBSTER (1)

Best Original Screenplay – Yorgos Lanthimos/Efthimis Filippou

 

THE NICE GUYS (2)

Best Comedy

Best Actor In A Comedy – Ryan Gosling

 

THE RED TURTLE (1)

Best Animated Feature

 

THE SALESMAN (1)

Best Foreign Language Film

 

THE WITCH (1)

Best Sci-Fi/Horror Movie

 

TONI ERDMANN (1)

Best Foreign Language Film

 

TROLLS (2)

Best Animated Feature

Best Song – Can’t Stop the Feeling

 

ZOOTOPIA (1)

Best Animated Feature

 

 

TELEVISION NOMINATIONS FOR THE 22nd ANNUAL CRITICS’ CHOICE AWARDS

 

BEST COMEDY SERIES

Atlanta – FX

Black-ish  – ABC

Fleabag – Amazon

Modern Family – ABC

Silicon Valley – HBO

Unbreakable Kimmy Schmidt – Netflix

Veep – HBO

 

BEST ACTRESS IN A COMEDY SERIES

Ellie Kemper – Unbreakable Kimmy Schmidt – Netflix

Julia Louis-Dreyfus – Veep – HBO

Kate McKinnon – Saturday Night Live – NBC

Tracee Ellis Ross – Black-ish – ABC

Phoebe Waller-Bridge – Fleabag – Amazon

Constance Wu – Fresh Off the Boat  – ABC

 

BEST ACTOR IN A COMEDY SERIES

Anthony Anderson – Black-ish – ABC

Will Forte – The Last Man on Earth  – FOX

Donald Glover – Atlanta – FX

Bill Hader – Documentary Now!  – IFC

Patrick Stewart – Blunt Talk  – Starz

Jeffrey Tambor – Transparent – Amazon

 

BEST SUPPORTING ACTRESS IN A COMEDY SERIES

Julie Bowen – Modern Family  – ABC

Anna Chlumsky – Veep – HBO

Allison Janney – Mom – CBS

Jane Krakowski – Unbreakable Kimmy Schmidt – Netflix

Judith Light – Transparent – Amazon

Allison Williams – Girls  – HBO

 

BEST SUPPORTING ACTOR IN A COMEDY SERIES

Louie Anderson – Baskets – FX

Andre Braugher – Brooklyn Nine-Nine – FOX

Tituss Burgess – Unbreakable Kimmy Schmidt – Netflix

Ty Burrell – Modern Family  – ABC

Tony Hale – Veep – HBO

T.J. Miller – Silicon Valley  – HBO

 

BEST GUEST PERFORMER IN A COMEDY SERIES

Alec Baldwin – Saturday Night Live – NBC

Christine Baranski – The Big Bang Theory  – CBS

Larry David – Saturday Night Live – NBC

Lisa Kudrow – Unbreakable Kimmy Schmidt – Netflix

Liam Neeson – Inside Amy Schumer – Comedy Central

 

BEST ANIMATED SERIES

Archer – FX

Bob’s Burgers – FOX

BoJack Horseman – Netflix

Son of Zorn – FOX

South Park – Comedy Central

The Simpsons – FOX

 

BEST REALITY COMPETITION SERIES

America’s Got Talent – NBC

MasterChef Junior – FOX

RuPaul’s Drag Race – Logo

Skin Wars – GSN

The Amazing Race – CBS

The Voice – NBC

 

BEST STRUCTURED REALITY SERIES

Chopped – Food Network

Inside The Actors Studio – Bravo

Penn & Teller: Fool Us – The CW

Project Runway – Lifetime

Shark Tank – ABC

Undercover Boss – CBS

 

BEST UNSTRUCTURED REALITY SERIES

Anthony Bourdain: Parts Unknown – CNN

Chrisley Knows Best – USA Network

Deadliest Catch – Discovery

Ice Road Truckers – History

Intervention – A&E

Naked and Afraid – Discovery

 

BEST TALK SHOW

Full Frontal with Samantha Bee – TBS

Jimmy Kimmel Live! – ABC

Last Week Tonight with John Oliver – HBO

The Daily Show with Trevor Noah – Comedy Central

The Late Late Show with James Corden – CBS

The Tonight Show Starring Jimmy Fallon – NBC

 

BEST REALITY SHOW HOST

Ted Allen – Chopped – Food Network

Tom Bergeron – Dancing with the Stars – ABC

Anthony Bourdain – Anthony Bourdain: Parts Unknown – CNN

Nick Cannon – America’s Got Talent – NBC

Carson Daly – The Voice – NBC

RuPaul – RuPaul’s Drag Race – Logo

 

BEST DRAMA SERIES

Better Call Saul – AMC

Game of Thrones – HBO

Mr. Robot – USA Network

Stranger Things – Netflix

The Crown – Netflix

This Is Us – NBC

Westworld – HBO

 

BEST ACTRESS IN A DRAMA SERIES

Caitriona Balfe – Outlander – Starz

Viola Davis – How to Get Away with Murder – ABC

Tatiana Maslany – Orphan Black – BBC America

Keri Russell – The Americans – FX

Evan Rachel Wood – Westworld – HBO

Robin Wright – House of Cards – Netflix

 

BEST ACTOR IN A DRAMA SERIES

Sam Heughan – Outlander – Starz

Rami Malek – Mr. Robot – USA Network

Bob Odenkirk – Better Call Saul – AMC

Matthew Rhys – The Americans – FX

Liev Schreiber – Ray Donovan – Showtime

Kevin Spacey – House of Cards – Netflix

 

BEST SUPPORTING ACTRESS IN A DRAMA SERIES

Christine Baranski – The Good Wife – CBS

Emilia Clarke – Game of Thrones – HBO

Lena Headey – Game of Thrones – HBO

Thandie Newton – Westworld – HBO

Maura Tierney – The Affair – Showtime

Constance Zimmer – UnREAL – Lifetime

 

BEST SUPPORTING ACTOR IN A DRAMA SERIES

Peter Dinklage – Game of Thrones – HBO

Kit Harington – Game of Thrones – HBO

John Lithgow – The Crown – Netflix

Michael McKean – Better Call Saul – AMC

Christian Slater – Mr. Robot – USA Network

Jon Voight – Ray Donovan – Showtime

 

BEST GUEST PERFORMER IN A DRAMA SERIES

Mahershala Ali – House of Cards – Netflix

Lisa Bonet – Ray Donovan – Showtime

Ellen Burstyn – House of Cards – Netflix

Michael J. Fox – The Good Wife – CBS

Jared Harris – The Crown – Netflix

Jeffrey Dean Morgan – The Walking Dead – AMC

 

BEST MOVIE MADE FOR TELEVISION OR LIMITED SERIES

All the Way – HBO

Confirmation – HBO

Killing Reagan – National Geographic

Roots – History

The Night Manager – AMC

The People v. O.J. Simpson – FX

 

BEST ACTRESS IN A MOVIE MADE FOR TELEVISION OR LIMITED SERIES

Olivia Colman – The Night Manager – AMC

Felicity Huffman – American Crime – ABC

Cynthia Nixon – Killing Reagan – National Geographic

Sarah Paulson – The People v. O.J. Simpson – FX

Lili Taylor – American Crime – ABC

Kerry Washington – Confirmation – HBO

 

BEST ACTOR IN A MOVIE MADE FOR TELEVISION OR LIMITED SERIES

Bryan Cranston – All the Way – HBO

Benedict Cumberbatch – Sherlock: The Abominable Bride – PBS

Cuba Gooding Jr. – The People v. O.J. Simpson – FX

Tom Hiddleston – The Night Manager – AMC

Tim Matheson – Killing Reagan – National Geographic

Courtney B. Vance – The People v. O.J. Simpson – FX

 

BEST SUPPORTING ACTRESS IN A MOVIE MADE FOR TELEVISION OR LIMITED SERIES

Elizabeth Debicki – The Night Manager – AMC

Regina King – American Crime – ABC

Sarah Lancashire – The Dresser – Starz

Melissa Leo – All the Way – HBO

Anna Paquin – Roots – History

Emily Watson – The Dresser – Starz

BEST SUPPORTING ACTOR IN A MOVIE MADE FOR TELEVISION OR LIMITED SERIES

Sterling K. Brown – The People v. O.J. Simpson – FX

Lane Garrison – Roots – History

Frank Langella – All the Way – HBO

Hugh Laurie – The Night Manager – AMC

John Travolta – The People v. O.J. Simpson – FX

Forest Whitaker – Roots – History

 

 

NOMINEES BY PROGRAM FOR THE 22nd ANNUAL CRITICS’ CHOICE AWARDS

 

All the Way, HBO (4)

Best Movie Made for Television or Limited Series

Best Actor in a Movie Made for Television or Limited Series

Best Supporting Actor in a Movie Made for Television or Limited Series

Best Supporting Actress in a Movie Made for Television or Limited Series

 

America’s Got Talent, NBC (2)

Best Reality Competition Series

Best Reality Show Host

 

American Crime, ABC (3)

Best Actress in a Movie Made for Television or Limited Series (2)

Best Supporting Actress in a Movie Made for Television or Limited Series

 

Anthony Bourdain: Parts Unknown, CNN (2)

Best Unstructured Reality Series

Best Reality Show Host

 

Archer, FX (1)

Best Animated Series

 

Atlanta, FX (2)

Best Comedy Series

Best Actor in a Comedy Series

 

Baskets, FX (1)

Best Supporting Actor in a Comedy Series

 

Better Call Saul, AMC (3)

Best Actor in a Drama Series

Best Supporting Actor in a Drama Series

Best Drama Series

 

Black-ish, ABC (3)

Best Comedy Series

Best Actress in a Comedy Series

Best Actor in a Comedy Series

 

Blunt Talk, Starz (1)

Best Actor in a Comedy Series

 

Bob’s Burgers, FOX (1)

Best Animated Series

 

BoJack Horseman, Netflix (1)

Best Animated Series

 

Brooklyn Nine-Nine, FOX (1)

Best Supporting Actor in a Comedy Series

 

Chopped, Food Network (2)

Best Structured Reality Series

Best Reality Show Host

 

Chrisley Knows Best, USA Network (1)

Best Unstructured Reality Series

 

Confirmation, HBO (2)

Best Movie Made for Television or Limited Series

Best Actress in a Movie Made for Television or Limited Series

 

Dancing with the Stars, ABC (1)

Best Reality Show Host

 

Deadliest Catch, Discovery (1)

Best Unstructured Reality Series

 

Documentary Now!, IFC (1)

Best Actor in a Comedy Series

 

Fleabag, Amazon (2)

Best Comedy Series

Best Actress in a Comedy Series

 

Fresh Off the Boat, ABC (1)

Best Actress in a Comedy Series

 

Full Frontal with Samantha Bee, TBS (1)

Best Talk Show

 

Game of Thrones, HBO (5)

Best Supporting Actor in a Drama Series (2)

Best Supporting Actress in a Drama Series (2)

Best Drama Series

 

Girls, HBO (1)

Best Supporting Actress in a Comedy Series

 

House of Cards, Netflix (4)

Best Actor in a Drama Series

Best Actress in a Drama Series

Best Guest Performer in a Drama Series (2)

 

How to Get Away with Murder, ABC (1)

Best Actress in a Drama Series

 

Ice Road Truckers, History (1)

Best Unstructured Reality Series

 

Inside Amy Schumer, Comedy Central (1)

Best Guest Performer in a Comedy Series

 

Inside the Actors Studio, Bravo (1)

Best Structured Reality Series

 

Intervention, A&E (1)

Best Unstructured Reality Series

 

Jimmy Kimmel Live!, ABC (1)

Best Talk Show

 

Killing Reagan, National Geographic (3)

Best Movie Made for Television or Limited Series

Best Actor in a Movie Made for Television or Limited Series

Best Actress in a Movie Made for Television or Limited Series

 

Last Week Tonight with John Oliver, HBO (1)

Best Talk Show

 

MasterChef Junior, FOX (1)

Best Reality Competition Series

 

Modern Family, ABC (3)

Best Comedy Series

Best Supporting Actress in a Comedy Series

Best Supporting Actor in a Comedy Series

 

Mom, CBS (1)

Best Supporting Actress in a Comedy Series

 

Mr. Robot, USA Network (3)

Best Supporting Actor in a Drama Series

Best Actor in a Drama Series

Best Drama Series

 

Naked and Afraid, Discovery (1)

Best Unstructured Reality Series

 

Orphan Black, BBC America (1)

Best Actress in a Drama Series

 

Outlander, Starz (2)

Best Actor in a Drama Series

Best Actress in a Drama Series

 

Penn & Teller: Fool Us, The CW (1)

Best Structured Reality Series

 

Project Runway, Lifetime (1)

Best Structured Reality Series

 

Ray Donovan, Showtime (3)

Best Supporting Actor in a Drama Series

Best Actor in a Drama Series

Best Guest Performer in a Drama Series

 

Roots, History (4)

Best Movie Made for Television or Limited Series

Best Supporting Actor in a Movie Made for Television or Limited Series (2)

Best Supporting Actress in a Movie Made for Television or Limited Series

 

RuPaul’s Drag Race, Logo (2)

Best Reality Competition Series

Best Reality Show Host

 

Saturday Night Live, NBC (3)

Best Actress in a Comedy Series

Best Guest Performer in a Comedy Series (2)

 

Shark Tank, ABC (1)

Best Structured Reality Series

 

Sherlock: The Abominable Bride, PBS (1)

Best Actor in a Movie Made for Television or Limited Series

 

Silicon Valley, HBO (2)

Best Comedy Series

Best Supporting Actor in a Comedy Series

 

Skin Wars, GSN (1)

Best Reality Competition Series

 

Son of Zorn, FOX (1)

Best Animated Series

 

South Park, Comedy Central (1)

Best Animated Series

 

Stranger Things, Netflix (1)

Best Drama Series

 

The Affair, Showtime (1)

Best Supporting Actress in a Drama Series

 

The Amazing Race, CBS (1)

Best Reality Competition Series

 

The Americans, FX (2)

Best Actor in a Drama Series

Best Actress in a Drama Series

 

The Big Bang Theory, CBS (1)

Best Guest Performer in a Comedy Series

 

The Crown, Netflix (3)

Best Supporting Actor in a Drama Series

Best Drama Series

Best Guest Performer in a Drama Series

 

The Daily Show with Trevor Noah, Comedy Central (1)

Best Talk Show

 

The Dresser, Starz (2)

Best Supporting Actress in a Movie Made for Television or Limited Series (2)

 

The Good Wife, CBS (2)

Best Supporting Actress in a Drama Series

Best Guest Performer in a Drama Series

 

The Last Man on Earth, FOX (1)

Best Actor in a Comedy Series

 

The Late Late Show with James Corden, CBS (1)

Best Talk Show

 

The Night Manager, AMC (5)

Best Movie Made for Television or Limited Series

Best Actor in a Movie Made for Television or Limited Series

Best Supporting Actor in a Movie Made for Television or Limited Series

Best Actress in a Movie Made for Television or Limited Series

Best Supporting Actress in a Movie Made for Television or Limited Series

 

The People v. O.J. Simpson, FX (6)

Best Movie Made for Television or Limited Series

Best Actor in a Movie Made for Television or Limited Series (2)

Best Supporting Actor in a Movie Made for Television or Limited Series (2)

Best Actress in a Movie Made for Television or Limited Series

 

The Simpsons, FOX (1)

Best Animated Series

 

The Tonight Show Starring Jimmy Fallon, NBC (1)

Best Talk Show

 

The Voice, NBC (2)

Best Reality Competition Series

Best Reality Show Host

 

The Walking Dead, AMC (1)

Best Guest Performer in a Drama Series

 

This Is Us, NBC (1)

Best Drama Series

 

Transparent, Amazon (2)

Best Actor in a Comedy Series

Best Supporting Actress in a Comedy Series

 

Unbreakable Kimmy Schmidt, Netflix (5)

Best Comedy Series

Best Actress in a Comedy Series

Best Supporting Actress in a Comedy Series

Best Supporting Actor in a Comedy Series

Best Guest Performer in a Comedy Series

 

Undercover Boss, CBS (1)

Best Structured Reality Series

 

UnREAL, Lifetime (1)

Best Supporting Actress in a Drama Series

 

Veep, HBO (4)

Best Comedy Series

Best Actress in a Comedy Series

Best Supporting Actress in a Comedy Series

Best Supporting Actor in a Comedy Series

 

Westworld, HBO (3)

Best Supporting Actress in a Drama Series

Best Actress in a Drama Series

Best Drama Series

 

 

NOMINEES BY NETWORK FOR THE 22nd ANNUAL CRITICS’ CHOICE AWARDS

 

HBO – 22

ABC – 14

Netflix – 14

FX – 12

NBC – 9

AMC – 7

CBS – 7

FOX – 6

History – 5

Starz – 5

Amazon – 4

Showtime – 4

USA Network – 4

Comedy Central – 3

National Geographic – 3

CNN – 2

Discovery – 2

Food Network – 2

Lifetime – 2

Logo – 2

A&E – 1

BBC America – 1

Bravo – 1

GSN – 1

IFC – 1

PBS – 1

TBS – 1

The CW – 1

The post Award Season Kicks off With the 22nd Annual Critics Choice Awards appeared first on Age of The Nerd.

8 Hollywood Couples Who Hit It Off On Set

Star Wars star, Carrie Fisher has admitted that she once had a fling with Harrison Ford when the two worked together on the set of Star Wars: Episode IV – A New Hope. The affair ended shortly after filming had completed, although the two reunited twice more on later Star Wars films during the 1980’s.

“It was so intense,” Fisher told People magazine. “It was Han and Leia during the week, and Carrie and Harrison during the weekend.”

Actors and actresses meeting on movie sets is surprisingly more common than one would think! Sometimes it may just result in a brief fling, as it was claimed to be between Fisher and Ford, but making movies have proven to have the ability to help actors discover their soul mate.

This editorial is going to take a look at a selection of ten accounts where two actors have come together in unity while making a motion picture.

Kristen Stewart and Robert Pattinson

stewart-pattinson

The Twilight films may stereotypically be known as some kind of twisted “chick flicks” for females but it helped Kristen Stewart and Robert Pattinson meet and get together, although it was a well kept secret for a while.

Apparently, Pattinson loved the fact that Stewart constantly smiled! Yeah, you and I must be thinking the same after reading that.

Rachel Weisz and Daniel Craig

craig-weisz

The movie Dream House was critically bashed and has now been mainly forgotten, but Craig and Weisz’ friendship evolved and blossomed into full time romance. The two are still married to this day. That must be hard work for her considering her actor partner’s alleged moodiness.

Emma Stone and Andrew Garfield

emma-stone-and-andrew-garfield

The Amazing Spiderman movies were not really worth making, were they? Let’s be honest. But the original must have at least two fans as Stone and Garfield hit it off. It is good to know that their romance is the only thing to have carried on since, and not more mediocre Spiderman sequels!

Angelina Jolie and Brad Pitt

brad-pitt-800-3

Probably known as the most famous film set get together of all time, Jolie and Pitt met on the set while making the modern action classic Mr & Mrs. Smith. The pair had been together for over a decade but their split was announced earlier this year due to many reasons unknown.

It seems that Jennifer Aniston has had the last laugh.

Nicole Kidman and Tom Cruise

tom-cruise-nicole-kidman_600x450-600x450

Scientologist Tom Cruise and Australian actress Nicole Kidman met while working together on the set of the vehicular action movie, Days of Thunder. It was another romantic Hollywood tale that lasted over ten years before Cruise and Kidman split in 2001. That infamous crazy moment by Cruise when interviewed by Oprah was still yet to happen.

Katie Holmes must still be cringing!

Goldie Hawn and Kurt Russell

kurt-russell-goldie-hawn

It is common knowledge that relationships between actors in Hollywood do not normally last long but Kurt Russell and Goldie Hawn have set a solid example to future couples after remaining together for 30 years. And are still going! The pair met while filming Swing Shift in 1983.

Ben Affleck and Jennifer Garner

rs_1024x759-160229144608-1024-ben-affleck-jennifer-garner-vanity-fair

There seem to be no end to the slagging off that 2003’s Daredevil starring Ben Affleck and Jennifer Garner, took and is taking. But that has not jinxed the couple’s 13 year relationship, who are happily married.

It is a good thing that making critically panned movies does not affect marriages or the couple probably would have broken up long ago!

David Arquette and Courtney Cox

Actors Courteney Cox and her husband David Arquette attend the 2010 Women in Film Crystal+Lucy Awards in Los Angeles June 1, 2010. REUTERS/Phil McCarten (UNITED STATES - Tags: ENTERTAINMENT PROFILE) - RTR2ENI4

Although unfortunately now separated, Cox and Arquette met while making the exemplary horror film, Scream in 1996. Their characters also had an “in -film” romantic affair that was on and off. The couple eventually split after an 11 year marriage together. Life really can imitate art!

The post 8 Hollywood Couples Who Hit It Off On Set appeared first on Age of The Nerd.

WordPress theme: Kippis 1.15