Full List of the 88th Academy Awards Winners

ChrisRock_TheOscars(PCM) The 88th Academy Awards aired on Sunday, February 28th, recognizing the best in film over the past year.

Hosted by Chris Rock, the Academy Awards show had its fair share of #OscarsSoWhite jokes and camera pans to the audience for their uncomfortable reaction shots and included a horribly awkward appearance from Clueless star Stacey Dash, wishing the audience a happy Black History Month.

There was also a handful of inspiring and touching moments throughout the night, including Lady Gaga’s powerful performance of the nominated song “Til It Happens To You” from The Hunting Ground, during which she brought sexual assault survivors out onto the stage.

Mad Max: Fury Road had a stellar night, winning six Oscars including Costume Design, Film Editing, Makeup and Hairstyling, and Production Design.

The Revenant also performed well, earning three Oscars for Best Direction, Best Cinematography, and Leonardo DiCaprio’s long-awaited Best Actor in a Leading Role Oscar.

The biggest surprise of the night goes to Tom McCarthy’s investigative drama Spotlight for winning the Oscar for Best Picture.

See the full list of the 88th Academy Award winners below!

BEST PICTURE

The Big Short

Bridge of Spies

Brooklyn

Mad Max: Fury Road

The Martian

The Revenant

Room

Spotlight – WINNER

=============================

ACTOR IN A LEADING ROLE

Bryan Cranston, Trumbo

Matt Damon, The Martian

Leonardo DiCaprio, The Revenant – WINNER

Michael Fassbender, Steve Jobs

Eddie Redmayne, The Danish Girl

=============================

ACTRESS IN A LEADING ROLE

Cate Blanchett, Carol

Brie Larson, Room – WINNER

Jennifer Lawrence, Joy

Charlotte Rampling, 45 Years

Saoirse Ronan, Brooklyn

=============================

ACTOR IN A SUPPORTING ROLE

Christian Bale, The Big Short

Tom Hardy, The Revenant

Mark Ruffalo, Spotlight

Mark Rylance, Bridge of Spies  – WINNER

Sylvester Stallone, Creed

=============================

ACTRESS IN A SUPPORTING ROLE

Jennifer Jason Leigh, The Hateful Eight

Rooney Mara, Carol

Rachel McAdams, Spotlight

Alicia Vikander, The Danish Girl  – WINNER

Kate Winslet, Steve Jobs

=============================

ANIMATED FEATURE FILM

Anomalisa

Boy and the World

Inside Out – WINNER

Shaun the Sheep Movie

When Marnie Was There

=============================

CINEMATOGRAPHY

Carol

The Hateful Eight

Mad Max: Fury Road

The Revenant  – WINNER

Sicario

=============================

COSTUME DESIGN

Carol

Cinderella

The Danish Girl

Mad Max: Fury Road  – WINNER

The Revenant

=============================

DIRECTING

The Big Short

Mad Max: Fury Road

The Revenant  – WINNER

Room

Spotlight

=============================

DOCUMENTARY (FEATURE)

Amy  – WINNER

Cartel Land

The Look of Silence

What Happened, Miss Simone?

Winter on Fire: Ukraine’s Fight for Freedom

=============================

DOCUMENTARY (SHORT SUBJECT)

Body Team 12

Chau, beyond the Lines

Claude Lanzmann: Spectres of the Shoah

A Girl in the River: The Price of Forgiveness  – WINNER

Last Day of Freedom

=============================

FILM EDITING

The Big Short

Mad Max: Fury Road  – WINNER

The Revenant

Spotlight

Star Wars: The Force Awakens

=============================

FOREIGN LANGUAGE FILM

Embrace of the Serpent

Mustang

Son of Saul  – WINNER

Theeb

A War

=============================

MAKEUP AND HAIRSTYLING

Mad Max: Fury Road  – WINNER

The 100-Year-Old Man Who Climbed out

the Window and Disappeared

The Revenant

=============================

MUSIC (ORIGINAL SCORE)

Bridge of Spies

Carol

The Hateful Eight, Ennio Moricone  – WINNER

Sicario

Star Wars: The Force Awakens

=============================

MUSIC (ORIGINAL SONG)

“Earned It,” Fifty Shades of Grey

“Manta Ray,” Racing Extinction

“Simple Song #3,” Youth

“Til It Happens To You,” The Hunting Ground

“Writing’s On The Wall,” Spectre  – WINNER

=============================

PRODUCTION DESIGN

Bridge of Spies

The Danish Girl

Mad Max: Fury Road  – WINNER

The Martian

The Revenant

=============================

SHORT FILM (ANIMATED)

Bear Story – WINNER

Prologue

Sanjay’s Super Team

We Can’t Live without Cosmos

World of Tomorrow

=============================

SHORT FILM (LIVE ACTION)

Ave Maria

Day One

Everything Will Be Okay (Alles Wird Gut)

Shok

Stutterer  – WINNER

=============================

SOUND EDITING

Mad Max: Fury Road  – WINNER

The Martian

The Revenant

Sicario

Star Wars: The Force Awakens

=============================

SOUND MIXING

Bridge of Spies

Mad Max: Fury Road  – WINNER

The Martian

The Revenant

Star Wars: The Force Awakens

=============================

VISUAL EFFECTS

Ex Machina  – WINNER

Mad Max: Fury Road

The Martian

The Revenant

Star Wars: The Force Awakens

=============================

WRITING (ADAPTED SCREENPLAY)

The Big Short – WINNER

Brooklyn

Carol

The Martian

Room

=============================

WRITING (ORIGINAL SCREENPLAY)

Bridge of Spies

Ex Machina

Inside Out

Spotlight – WINNER

Straight Outta Compton

The post Full List of the 88th Academy Awards Winners first appeared on Movie News & Reviews.

The Revenant: The Little Oscar Engine That Shouldn’t

The red carpets have been laid out and freshly steamed across a good stretch of Hollywood Blvd. A “who’s who” of Hollywood’s most photogenic, ambitious and legendary ready themselves to file into the Dolby Theater to see and congratulate who their peers have voted “the best of the best” for the 88th Academy Awards. In the hours leading up to the televised ceremony, the lines have been drawn by critics, cinephiles and casual moviegoers in their contrasting opinions over what film should take the coveted Picture statue home. Ranging from critical darlings Mad Max: Fury Road, Room and Spotlight to Steven Spielberg and Ridley Scott returning to their classic elements with Bridge of Spies and The Martian, respectively, to The Big Short, an important film about the 2008 financial collapse told through an idiosyncratic style that’s perfectly ingenious, the Best Picture race will either be, depending on one’s perspective, either an inspired lineup or an expected one. But as of late December, one nominee has seemingly taken audiences and guilds by storm and it isn’t John Crowley’s charming Brooklyn.

Alejandro González Iñárritu’s The Revenant. A tale of searing vengeance in the frozen Northern Plains, Iñárritu’s follow-up to last year’s Picture / Director winner Birdman or (The Unexpected Virtue of Ignorance), seems poised to make history tonight for numerous reasons, including the potential of Iñárritu being the first director in sixty-five years to win consecutive Directing Oscars, not to mention being the first filmmaker to helm consecutive Picture winners. Legendary cinematographer Emmanuel Lubezki will more than likely be taking his third Oscar in a row home after losing for Alfonso Cuarón’s Children of Men and Terrence Malick’s The New World and The Tree of Life, films and filmmakers that will be making later appearances in this op-ed, and, of course, Leonardo DiCaprio. The current frontrunner for Best Actor in a Leading Role will more than likely finally win the elusive Oscar his fanbase has been clamoring for him to have since his first nomination for What’s Eating Gilbert Grape?, back in 1993.

But is The Revenant deserving of all these acclaim and its position as the most nominated film at the Oscars? Professionally: No. Personally: Hell no! To explain why, I’ll divide my opinion into an analytical one regarding the film’s and Iñárritu’s chances followed by my own two cents on them:

the-revenant-fn01

Analytically, the last director to have consecutive Directing wins from the Academy was Joseph L. Mankiewicz in 1950 for All About Eve, and before him, John Ford for How Green Was My Valley in 1941. As earlier stated, if he manages to pull off a second win here, Iñárritu will be the first director in sixty-five years to have pulled consecutive wins. Also on his side are his recent Golden Globe, BAFTA and DGA wins. But neither of the first two have been the most assured way to predict who will win the Oscar. Going by this decade, the BAFTA has lined up with the Oscar win only twice – for Michel Hazanavicius for The Artist and Alfonso Cuarón for Gravity, both of whom won the DGA; with the Golden Globes, only Cuarón went on to Oscar glory. On the other hand, a handful of pundits and analytical film fans have suggested online that Iñárritu’s fortune this year hasn’t been because The Revenant is the best of the nominees, but because those awards bodies wanted to make up for not giving him the wins the previous year where he was overshadowed by Richard Linklater and Boyhood, which may be a very plausible reason. After all, most people are of the opinion an actor or filmmaker tends to win more for the wrong film because of the “due” factor behind them. As a final note on this part, if he does win, this will also mark the second year in a row he has won over critical frontrunners. Last year was Linklater; this year would be George Miller for Mad Max: Fury Road.

Another online argument supporting Iñárritu winning a second Directing award is the “Oscars So White” controversy. For the second year in a row, the Oscars have come under fire for predominantly white nominees in the acting and directing categories. And some online have suggested the Academy would gladly award the Latino director another win to demonstrate its acknowledgment of racial diversity and inclusion. Last year, when Ava DuVernay was overlooked for a Directing nomination for Selma in favor of Imitation Game director Morten Tyldum, there was reason to be “angry.” Selma was one of the most acclaimed movies of this decade while The Imitation Game was viewed as another well made but obvious Weinstein Company Oscar vehicle.

Of course, if this turns out to be the case, then the Oscars will have sacrificed a great deal of integrity by denying a generally deserving winner, regardless of skin color, in an attempt to be “inclusive” for the “Tumblr generation.”

revenant-dicaprio-inarritu-scalping

Then there’s the matter of my own personal opinion: it just simply isn’t the best of the nominees this year. I wouldn’t go so far as to say of this decade, but even if I did, I would go back and remember a morning in the winter of 2011 when the world was completely dumbfounded by the announcement of the critically reviled Extremely Loud and Incredibly Close as a Picture nominee. What I’ve said doesn’t mean I think The Revenant is a bad movie. On a technical level, it’s quite an experience that you’d be hard pressed to find in most mainstream theaters nowadays, the performances from Leonardo DiCaprio and Tom Hardy compliment each other well and Ryuichi Sakamoto & Alva Noto’s score for the movie is very haunting. There’s certainly the ambition and scope to support its nomination, but ambition and scope can only go so far when telling a story of this magnitude.

The main narrative of the film’s awards campaign has been all about how Iñárritu opted to shoot the entire film chronologically on location in America, Canada, Mexico and Argentina using primarily natural light, aside from one small scene Emmanuel Lubezki says required electric light, and how the cast and crew suffered during the making of the film due to the extreme weather conditions and the director’s “temperamental nature,” leading to several crew members walking off the set and a day where actor Tom Hardy physically attacked Iñárritu, the image now being immortalized on t-shirts being sold online. That’s honestly a horrible narrative to push about a film in order to spark peoples’ interests or get an award. Speaking from personal experiences, all sets are hard. You have to get everything accomplished by a certain period of time, which puts the crew under emotional duress to get it right. I imagine it must have been difficult to pull off a majority of the action sequences in Mad Max: Fury Road, but you don’t hear George Miller or Charlize Theron running to Variety to give them headlines about difficulty. A movie should be effective by what it says on screen, not by what everyone off screen said happened.

And that’s without my defining opinion of The Revenant that’s been problematic to me about it since seeing the film in late December. The Revenant not only looks like Iñárritu taking a number of ideas and cues from legendary filmmakers like Terrence Malick and Andrei Tarkovsky, but arguably making the movie look like a compilation of deleted scenes taken from Malick’s The New World. Not only does Iñárritu seemingly have Lubezki recreate the look of the The New World, but he also use a number of Malick’s key crew members – along with Emmanuel Lubezki were production designer Jack Fisk, costumer Jacqueline West, all of who worked on The New World and were nominated this year for The Revenant – helping further cement the Malick-ian feel of this frozen world we spend two and a half hours in. Compare the work Lubezki, a cinematographer whose talents are undeniable and can bring an audience into any filmmaker’s world with ease, does with Iñárritu to what he’s done with Malick (not just “The New World” or “The Tree of Life”, but Malick’s recent film “Knight of Cups” showcases a number of stunning sequences featuring landmark Los Angeles and Las Vegas locations in a whole new light) or Cuarón with Children of Men, where that film took one-take sequences to a new level. With those directors, Lubezki has crafted a set style that makes it easier to identify the filmmaker whereas his work with Iñárritu feels almost identity-less. I think it’s important for a director-cinematographer collaboration to have their own distinction

THE REVENANT Copyright � 2015 Twentieth Century Fox Film Corporation. All rights reserved. THE REVENANT Motion Picture Copyright � 2015 Regency Entertainment (USA), Inc. and Monarchy Enterprises S.a.r.l. All rights reserved.Not for sale or duplication.

Now that I’ve said my piece about Iñárritu and Malick, we’ll move on to Iñárritu and Tarkovsky. In early February, a video was posted by YouTube vlogger Misha Petrick highlighting an extensive number of key Revenant scenes that were meticulously inspired stylistically by a number of Tarkovsky’s films (the link – https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yvkiG3lGuUQ), inspiring another debate about how original the look and style of The Revenant was. If Quentin Tarantino had done something like that, he would have been taken to task by the online communities. And he has for a number of his films in the past. Over the course of this month at his New Beverly Cinema in Los Angeles, Tarantino has organized screenings of John Carpenter’s The Thing, Sergio Corbucci’s The Great Silence, Sam Peckinpah’s “The Wild Bunch” and his own Reservoir Dogs to screen alongside his recent film The Hateful Eight as he wears his heart on his sleeve about his cinematic inspirations for his own movies. Homage is not a terrible thing in film because it allows us, the audience, to discover a wider range of films, such as what Tarantino does with films like The Hateful Eight, but in the case of Iñárritu, when a filmmaker seems to be coasting on ideas and key features from others and passing them on to an audience uneducated or interested in those filmmakers, that’s where another one of my problems lies.

And where does Leonardo DiCaprio himself fit into this? It’s easy to think highly of the performance when taking the physical extremes that were used to portray Hugh Glass into consideration. To think of what DiCaprio is able to achieve with his body against the frozen wilderness he crawls and stumbles through for a majority of the film’s 156 minute running time is incredible. But again, much like ambition, physicality doesn’t make a performance. For me, an example of a stronger leading male performance this year was Michael Fassbender as Steve Jobs. His job is arguably easier, but it still takes a lot to get into the head of such an infamous figure in modern pop culture and find the humanity in him. When DiCaprio wins, it will be less because he is the most deserving of the five nominees (which he arguably isn’t) and more for the same reasons Julianne Moore finally won her first Oscar for Still Alice last year–an overdue actor / actress in a role that’s just too good for the Academy and audience members to pass up. Moore’s performance as a linguistics professor whose life is changed when she’s diagnosed with early onset Alzheimer’s was a quietly devastating performance, but — and I mean no offense to the late director Richard Glatzer and his directing partner Wash Westmoreland — when the performance is far stronger than the film it’s a part of, for me, that’s another thing I take into account.

revenant cover

There’ve been major awards contenders featuring protagonists with little background and development where you’re still able to find a connection with them by the end of that, something that I just never had with Hugh Glass from the get-go. I feel for the situation he finds himself in because he’s been horribly mauled by a bear, his son is killed in front of him and he’s left for dead in a ditch, but he honestly brings the bear situation on himself by constantly provoking the enraged mother bear who’s only protecting her cubs from his gunshots, the addition of the fictional son and family is a cheat to play on peoples’ emotions (this isn’t the first film to play “fast and loose” with a real life protagonist’s history and it sure won’t be the last) and the situations Glass finds himself in to return to civilization and find his enemy borderline on comedic by the third act and detract from the heart and message Iñárritu is trying to convey. Even anonymous voting members of the Academy aren’t taking “the bait,” with opinions posted on the Hollywood Reporter ranging from exhaustion listening to the cast and crew talk about the extreme shooting conditions to the unbelievability of Glass’s journey.

So far this decade, we’ve seen the Academy declare stuttering kings, shamed film stars and wrongfully enslaved free men the stories that have added to the pantheon of incredible cinema. This year will possibly see the potential of one lone man surviving an apocalyptic wasteland in the hunt for his humanity and, unfortunately, it won’t be the right Tom Hardy movie. Personally, I think if they want to give Iñárritu wins for this, the Academy would do better to build a time machine, return to 2005, and give infamous Picture winner “Crash”’s nominations for Picture and director Paul Haggis to Terrence Malick. But regardless of whether The Revenant is a repeat of Birdman’s awards success for Iñárritu this year or, by some shock, goes the route of American Hustle, i.e. the big event movie that enters the theater guns blazing and leaves with nothing to its credit, it is a film that will have a long life amongst filmgoers and critics over its potentially controversial place in the annals of American cinema.

The post The Revenant: The Little Oscar Engine That Shouldn’t appeared first on Age of The Nerd.

Age of the Nerd’s 2016 Oscar BATTLE!!!

With the 88th Academy awards mere days upon us, the staff of Age of the Nerd have convened to give our pics for the culmination of 2015’s awards season. There’s been a lot of build-up to this years Oscars ceremony, with many (other than ourselves) pretty much expecting The Revenant to take the night’s top prize going into this year’s awards race. But as the awards season rolled on, we learned something–this has been amazingly diverse year for film.

Unlike many previous years in recent memory, this year’s academy awards seem more split than ever. With the sudden emergence of such awards-contenders as The Big Short, Mad Max: Fury Road, and The Martian coming into the best picture race, it’s really tough to tell who will come out on top after this Sunday’s ceremony. If our picks are any indication, this year is sure to be one of the most split years in Oscar history. Suffice to say that we probably won’t be getting any movie with 10+ wins this year.

So, without further adieu, here are our staff picks for this year’s oscars ceremony:

oscars-normal

Jason ‘s Picks —

Best Picture: The Martian
Actor: Leonardo DiCaprio, The Revenant

Actress: Brie Larson, Room

Supporting Actor: Tom Hardy, The Revenant

Supporting Actress: Rachel McAdams, Spotlight
Animated Feature: Anomalisa
Cinematography: Mad Max: Fury Road
Costume Design: Mad Max: Fury Road
Director: George Miller, Mad Max: Fury Road 
Documentary:  Amy
Documentary Short: 
Film Editing: Mad Max: Fury Road
Foreign Film: 
Make-up & Hair: 
Original Score: The Hateful Eight
Original Song: “Til It Happens To You”, The Hunting Ground
Production Design: 
Animated Short: 
Short Film: 
Sound Editing: 
Sound Mixing: 
Visual Effects: The Martian
Adapted Screenplay: The Big Short
Original Screenplay: Straight Outta Compton

 

Pete’s Picks —

Best Picture: The Big Short
Actor: 
Leonardo DiCaprio, The Revenant
Actress: Brie Larson, Room

Supporting Actor: Sylvester Stallone, Creed

Supporting Actress: 
Alicia Vikander, The Danish Girl
Animated Feature: Inside Out
Cinematography: The Revenant
Costume Design: 
Mad Max: Fury Road
Director: George Miller, 
Mad Max: Fury Road
Documentary: 
Cartel Land
Documentary Short: Claude Lanzmann: Spectres of the Shoah
Film Editing: Mad Max: Fury Road
Foreign Film: Son of Saul, Hungary
Make-up & Hair: Mad Max: Fury Road
Original Score: Ennio Morricone, 
The Hateful Eight
Original Song: “
Til It Happens To You”, The Hunting Ground
Production Design: The Revenant
Animated Short: Sanjay’s Super Team
Short Film: Day One
Sound Editing: Star Wars: The Force Awakens
Sound Mixing: Mad Max: Fury Road
Visual Effects: Mad Max: Fury Road
Adapted Screenplay: The Big Short
Original Screenplay: Spotlight

 

Chris’ Picks —

Best Picture: The Revenant
Actor: Leonardo DiCaprio, The Revenant

Actress: 
Jennifer Lawrence, Joy
Supporting Actor: Tom Hardy, The Revenant

Supporting Actress: Jennifer Jason Leigh, The Hateful Eight
Animated Feature: Anomalisa
Cinematography: The Revenant
Costume Design: Cinderella
Director: Alejandro G. Iñárritu, The Revenant
Documentary: What Happened, Miss Simone
Documentary Short: A Girl in the River: The Price of Forgiveness
Film Editing: The Revenant
Foreign Film: Theeb
Make-up & Hair: Mad Max: Fury Road
Original Score: The Hateful Eight
Original Song: – “Earned It” Fifty Shades of Grey
Production Design: Bride of Spies
Animated Short: Sanjay’s Super Team
Short Film: Ave Maria
Sound Editing: The Martian
Sound Mixing: The Martian
Visual Effects: Ex Machina
Adapted Screenplay: The Martian
Original Screenplay: Straight Outta Compton

 

Kristyn’s Picks —

Best Picture: The Revenant
Actor: Leonardo DiCaprio, The Revenant

Actress: Brie Larson, Room

Supporting Actor: 
Tom Hardy, The Revenant
Supporting Actress: Alicia Vikander, The Danish Girl
Animated Feature: 
Anomalisa
Cinematography: 
The Revenant
Costume Design: 
The Danish Girl
Director: George Miller, Mad Max: Fury Road
Documentary: The Look of Silence
Documentary Short: Body Team 12
Film Editing: 
Mad Max: Fury Road
Foreign Film: 
Son of Saul
Make-up & Hair: 
Mad Max: Fury Road
Original Score: 
The Hateful Eight
Original Song: “Writing’s on the Wall,” Spectre
Production Design: 
Mad Max: Fury Road
Animated Short: 
Prologue
Short Film: 
Day One
Sound Editing: Star Wars: The Force Awakens
Sound Mixing: Star Wars: The Force Awakens
Visual Effects: Mad Max: Fury Road
Adapted Screenplay: Room
Original Screenplay: Straight Outta Compton

 

Sean’s Picks —

Best Picture:The Revenant
Actor: Leonardo DiCaprio, The Revenant

Actress: Brie Larson, Room

Supporting Actor: Slyvester Stallone, Creed

Supporting Actress: Kate Winslet, Steve Jobs
Animated Feature: Inside Out
Cinematography: The Revenant
Costume Design: Mad Max: Fury Road
Director: George Miller
Documentary: The Look of Silence
Documentary Short: Last Day of Freedom
Film Editing: The Revenant
Foreign Film: Son of Saul, Hungary
Make-up & Hair: The Revenant
Original Score: The Hateful Eight
Original Song:”Earned It” 50 Shades of Grey
Production Design: Bridge of Spies
Animated Short: Sanjay’s Super Team
Short Film: Day One
Sound Editing: Star Wars: The Force Awakens
Sound Mixing: The Martian
Visual Effects: Mad Max: Fury Road
Adapted Screenplay: The Big Short
Original Screenplay: Spotlight

 

Taylor’s Picks —

Best Picture: The Big Short
Actor: Leonardo DiCaprio, The Revenant
Actress: Brie Larson, Room

Supporting Actor: Sylvester Stallone, Creed

Supporting Actress: Jennifer Jason Leigh, The Hateful Eight
Animated Feature: Inside Out
Cinematography: The Revenant
Costume Design: Cinderella
Director: George Miller, Mad Max: Fury Road
Documentary: Amy
Documentary Short: Last Day of Freedom
Film Editing: Mad Max: Fury Road
Foreign Film: Son of Saul
Make-up & Hair: The Revenant
Original Score: The Hateful Eight
Original Song: “Writing’s on the Wall”, Spectre
Production Design: Bridge of Spies
Animated Short: Sanjay’s Super Team
Short Film: Day One
Sound Editing: Star Wars: The Force Awakens
Sound Mixing: Mad Max: Fury Road
Visual Effects: Ex Machina
Adapted Screenplay: The Martian
Original Screenplay: Straight Outta Compton

So there you have it readers! These our 2016 Oscar predictions. We thought we could bring some fun to this hollow spectacle, by once again making a game amongst the Age of The Nerd editorial staff. Very simple: whoever has the most correct number of predictions wins. The winner will gets to skip out on news coverage for a week, and focus on a passion piece. The LOSER (whoever comes in dead last) will have to write up our “Oscars Recap Article”. Should it feature their personal, and most likely controversial breakdown of #OscarsSoWhite? Let us know your predictions in the comments section below!

The post Age of the Nerd’s 2016 Oscar BATTLE!!! appeared first on Age of The Nerd.

Oscar Nominee Paco Delgado Discusses Dressing The Danish Girl

Danish-Girl

(PCM) We recently had a chance to catch up with Oscar nominated costume designer Paco Delgado to discuss bringing the story of Lili Elbe to life through costuming in the film “The Danish Girl”.  His work on “The Danish Girl” marks the second Academy Award nomination for Paco Delgado, as he was previously nominated for his phenomenal work on the film “Les Miserables” .

Q: What did you enjoy the most about working on the “Danish Girl”?

PACO DELGADO: The most amazing thing is to be able to work on a project that is relevant for people. I hope that this movie can be able to help people see transgender issues and gain a better understanding.

Q: What was the biggest challenge in dressing Lily through the entire transformation?

PD: Well, I think the whole thing itself because if you imagine when I got this script and from the very beginning Tom Hooper told me this character was going to be played by Eddie [Redmanye] and I know Eddie from other jobs in the past and the challenge was how to make this man look like a woman, a real woman, a believable one and in tune with all the respect that we have to do to portray this singular and amazing person.

We were very lucky because the level of respect and trust that we had between me and Eddie and Tom and Jan Sewell, the make-up artist, was really, really high and we worked together in a certain way with trying and failing and then trying and succeeding. We found how to make Eddie look like a fantastic woman.

Q: Everyone did such a tremendous job with the film. Were there any additional challenges based upon the fact that Lili was actually a real person, from a research perspective?

PD: The difficult thing is Eddie is a tall man and he has a man’s bone structure, as he has the body of a man without the curve or shape of a woman. He also has an Adam’s Apple, so all these little things caused us to start working with fabric, to think which fabric worked better for him. There were certain fabrics that cling to his body or were cloaking on his body and didn’t show his shape.
We also looked at which colors were more softening to his angles, because he is a man with angles with a very powerful bone structure in his shoulders, so we had to look at what colors were making him softer and in this movie a lot of it is using a scarf going around his neck. It’s just because he had an Adam’s Apple and we had to hide it somehow.

Obviously, if you know the 20’s, you don’t see a lot of open chest and the neck, but we have the scarf to hide that. We just put ourselves in the situation, if we were Lili, what would you do? Because at that point there wasn’t a cosmetic surgery as we know it today. Now you can do surgery on your Adam’s Apple, but you couldn’t at the time. If she had an Adam’s Apple she had to live with it and she had to find out how to hide it on a daily basis. This is the way we work really.

Q: Can you talk about more of the symbolism behind the scarf other than to just mask the Adam’s Apple?

PD: The scarf has two different properties in this film. One was to hide the masculinity that Lily had and the other one was like a symbolic in place for Lili’s soul and of Lili and Gerda’s bonding because this scarf goes from one to the other through the whole movie. It represented and was a metaphor of their ties together.
We also have to remember that this movie is about Lili’s journey into become a woman but also it’s a love story basically. There is an amazing love story between two people who are capable of giving up themselves in order to become freer somehow.

Gerda’s love for Lily is so high that she is really capable of helping Lili find life but sacrificing her relationship, which was the dearest thing she had. That scarf represented, in a way, this bonding but also this symbolic part at the end where she leaves the scarf to be freer and expose the soul of Lili.

Q: Can you talk a bit about the power of costumes in general , including the ones we wear in our daily lives?

PD: I am real advocate of costumes and clothes and I think we have to be aware of how important clothes are because while they have a functional side, obviously they are good for us when we are cold or they are good for us when we need to be protected, but also clothes reflect our psychology, our state-of-mind, and our social status.

In this special story, costumes provide a visual side to the world if you want to change your gender because also costumes are attached to gender and you can see how the costumes can have different reactions from people. In this movie we have this moment where Eddie is wearing this suit that is a suit made in a fabric that flows much the same way as a woman fabric and he becomes a very ambiguous shape in this particular outfit.

We have to remember that sometimes clothes can draw reaction from people, for instance if you are very well dressed people can say ‘Oh, you look wonderful’ but also, if you are offended by someone’s outfit you can get aggressive and that shows you how important costumes are. They are a very, very important part of our society and us as human beings.

The post Oscar Nominee Paco Delgado Discusses Dressing The Danish Girl first appeared on Movie News & Reviews.

Rejoice Cord Cutters! The Oscars Will Be Streaming This Year!

88thchrisrock2

(PCM) The 88th Annual Academy Awards will air this Sunday on ABC and many cord cutters were under the fear that they would be forced to watch dozens of streaming video clips to catch a glimpse of the either the red carpet or the show itself. ABC has now revealed that the entire three-hour Oscar’s telecast will be live streaming via their website for those of us that have done away with traditional cable TV service. It will be available in most markets.

Here’s how to live stream:

Head to ABC’s site and stream it. Just like last year, ABC is streaming it for free (in some markets). ABC only offers livestreaming in Chicago, Fresno, Houston, Los Angeles, New York City, Philadelphia, Raleigh-Durham, and San Francisco. When you go to the website, you will be prompted to fill-in your TV provider credentials.

You can also download the Official Oscar’s App made by ABC and available for download in the App Store, on Google Play, and via Amazon. But again, it only works in the aforementioned cities, and again, will require that you have an account with a TV provider.

The Oscars will air Sunday, February 28, live on ABC at 7 p.m. ET/4 p.m. PT and will be hosted by comedian Chris Rock!

Enter The #OscarsWithMoviePass Contest! Winner Receives A Full Year Of MoviePass!

Moviepass

(PCM) The team at MoviePass is made up of movie diehards and they are incredibly eager for everyone to see movies in theaters! It is no question that the Academy Awards is the biggest movie event of the years, so they are hosting the ultimate Oscar pool to reward the biggest cinephiles out there and calling it #OscarsWithMoviePass.

All you need to do to enter is fill out our official ballot with your best predictions of who the final Oscar winners of 2016 will be. The person with the ballot closest to the winner list will win a FULL YEAR of MoviePass and all the movies in theaters they could ask for from 2016 and beyond. Runner-up will receive SIX MONTHS.

MoviePass is the only nationwide movie theater subscription service, allowing members to see a new, standard 2D movie every day in 95% of theaters nationwide for one monthly fee. There are no blackout dates like with some discounted ticket programs, so as soon as a movie hits the theaters, you can see it with MoviePass. The ballot will be open for entries until 3pm EST on February 28th, then the winners will be revealed on or before March 4th. The full rules are listed here.

The post Enter The #OscarsWithMoviePass Contest! Winner Receives A Full Year Of MoviePass! first appeared on Movie News & Reviews.

WordPress theme: Kippis 1.15